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, a memorial service for senator dan all inouye at washington national cathedral. then the u cozy are youth parliament holds its annual debate at the british house of commons. the alliance for health reform hosts a discussion on increasing the eligibility age for medicare >> when i first came to washington in 1968 as a staff member to a democrat, bill palmer, one of the things they do on thursday night, they'd play gin rummy in the capitol and my job was to pour the cheap bourbon light the cigars and there was camaraderie, and john made the point many times, when you have had dinner with somebody or friends with somebody and you go out with your families, your less left-hand side to cut their throat politically. >> and then jack kemp became the ranking member, and jack and i used to go out and have meals together and talk football half the time, and then budgets, and even though we disagreed significantly on almost everything, we learned to like each other. he was not evil and i was not evil. pre the problem you got now is people think that the guy on the other side or the gal on the other
in principle. this is a compelling story of what it means to be an american. dan inouye had an impact on so many lives, including mine. his extraordinary accomplishments at the stuff of legend. not all tested in world war ii, despite severe burns prevailed in combat, recipient of our nation's highest award for valor, the medal of honor. distinguished senator from hawaii, president pro tem of the senate. the site also exemplified the qualities most revered by his community, quiet humility, respect for others, standing on principles that matter. family, service to community. a modest man who is assertive and doing what was right. when america was plunged into the crucible of world war ii, nowhere was the attack on pearl harbor more keenly felt than in the japanese-american community. it's difficult today to recall the full intensity of fear, of confucian, a suspicion of recrimination, even hatred that are merged in the days and weeks and months following a surprise attack 71 years ago. and despite the clear injustice in the dinner relocating so many of the japanese community. second-generatio
wanted to be late in the process. i'd been in the senate one day, and back in 1985, and dan inouye came to visit me in my office. he was up here, i was down here. and he just introduced himself, we talked a bit about our states, he had all kinds of seniority and, you know, amazing qualities. and i was nothing. and he came to see me. i'm sorry, but you don't forget things like that. says something about him which went through his life. just the way he was. from there, a long friendship began. and while i believed he looked at me as a friend, i looked to him as so much more than that. he was in a total sense a mentor with sort of a confucian touch because he had a japanese heritage and i had an interest in japan and he had a way of imparting judgments and wisdom which were in the eastern method, very subtle. he was not always that way, but he could be, and he was with me. i learned from him how this chamber works, how to get things done. i watched the way he did them. not with a heavy fist or sharp words, but with thoughtfulness, hard work, a commanding presence, that voice, that voice. a
. [applause] morris manning, patrick rose all, dan 11, and i, walked into a metaphorical room all summer, emerged not only intact but breathlessly in sync. a lasting poetry the poetry that brought to our doorsteps and stopped us there, pushing all the other work away, we didn't disagree, but more than that we shared a passion and a sense of urgency about seeing that this work was brought forth and presented to the world. in other words, this was easy and obvious just like all the internal and external wrestling that went into it. i make it sound as if we didn't even need to talk about it, but oh, did we talk. oh, did we list. oh, did we worry. but we did in sympathy and with a shared vision. and although i like to think that my group of panelists was of course uniquely incredible, and that we were destined to do this together, i do believe in the end it was these five books we finally collapsed with and applauded and loved as a group that made it possible for us to emerge full of joint about this process. a finalist for the national book award in poetry this year r. david ferry, but wild
with dan note as richard handing over the crown to henrik iv played by james lockhart? maybe. the best shakespearean analog is julius caesar. with the dictator, mortgage finance cut down in the capital, henry paulson this time playing brutus, i am thinking of the great scene where mark antony stands over and addresses the murdered body of caesar. this time we have mark antony played by bob hagerty standing over and addressing the fallen fannie, oh mighty fannie, do you live solo? that is enough indulging myself. your indulgence. we are about to hear from the author of this excellent book. after bob's presentation we have ten minute comments and i will introduce at that point and we will follow that with discussion, including your questions at 6:00 and adjourn for reception. and a book signing an informal discussion at that point. and in the wall street journal, and does work as reporter and bureau chief for the wall street journal, and the international herald tribune in hong kong, london, brussels, paris, atlanta, served as managing editor of the asian wall street journal and london b
. judith boar tease. susan cooper. dan yell, it's a great honor to be a part of the committee with you. i knew i would find wisdom in you all. i never expected to find friends. thank you for your labor and high and noble courtesy and kindness. for your belief that writing for young people is critically important for our culture. in such strangely troubled dais brought me back to hope. thank you. [applause] the five finalists are william alexander. goblin secrets. published. [cheering and applause] "out of reach" [cheering and applause] a story of the eleventh of love and loss. patricia mccormick "never fall down." [cheering and applause] an imprint of harpers colins publishing. a harrow and bravely told story of survival. elliot "endangered." [cheering and applause] published by scholastic books. a story of love that extends all boundaries even though that lie behind species. "race to build and steal the most's dangerous weapon" published by flash point. a rivetting thriller of the book that tells of a birth of age. to the writers, thank you. thank you for your work. and thank you for wha
on this appointment to fill the seat of the late senator dan inouye, who as we all know, was an institution in and of himself. once he is sworn in, the designee will be one of the youngest senators in this body. nevertheless, he has a long history of serving the state of hawaii. prior to entering politics, the senator-designee served for eight years as c.e.o. of helping hands hawaii, one of hawaii's largest nonprofit social services organization. he's also served four terms in the hawaii assembly house of representatives and served until just a few minutes ago as the lieutenant governor of the state of hawaii. having been a lieutenant governor, he has experience as a legislator and then as one of the presiding officers of the entire senate, speaks of itself as helping prepare for this job he has here. he will build upon the foundation laid during senator inouye's five decades of representing the state of hawaii. while no one can fill the shoes of our friend, senator inouye, brian schatz is a young man with a future full of promise and opportunity. mr. president, i would ask unanimous consen
a professor, dan smith, from the university of florida testified at your hearing in tampa. in fact, that his investigation, is the university investigation found that there were two particular groups that utilized in the history of florida early voting over the previous decade sundays as the time that they voted. one was african-americans, and the other was hispanics. that was one thing the legislation did. the law also made voting harder for people who had moved from one county to another and had a different address. because when they showed up to the new voter registration, if they did not have in their documentation, such as their drivers license, which likely they had not updated from the old address, it was a different county, they were not allowed a ballot. they were given a provisional ballot, and we know from the 2008 elections of the provisional ballots cast, one half of them in 2008 were thrown out. now, as a result of the new voter suppression law, you've already stated, mr. chairman, long lines an avalanche of provisional ballots, court challenges, all of it has come to pass. you
with two retiring lawmakers, congressman dan burton and senator kent conrad. mr. burton, an indiana republican, served in congress for 30 years, and in the 1990s chaired the house oversight committee. senator conrad, the north dakota democrat, has been in office for 20 years and chairs the senate budget committee. our interview with congressman burton is at 8 p.m. wednesday night and senator conrad follows at 8:30. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 24, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable mary l. landrieu, a senator from the state of louisiana, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. on thursday, december 27, 2012. >> we're going to go back to our booktv programming now. kevin ryan, president and ceo of covenant house, and tina kelley, former st
daughters. [applause] my husband dan, my mom and dad and all of you. i'd like to, in the end, accept this in the spirit of the turtle mountain chippewa people and in recognition of the grace and end diewrns of native women. this is a book about a huge case of ip justice ongoing -- injustice ongoing on reservations, and thank you for giving it a wider audience. it means so much to all of us. thank you. [applause] in and so this concludes the ceremony. please, help me congratulate all the finalists, winners and judges. [cheers and applause] everyone is invited to join the after party on the balcony. i would sincerely like to thank the national book foundation and especially harold for inviting me to be a part of this evening. and one book i have predictably read a lot of lately is "good night moon." so i would like to end tonight's ceremony with this. good night eaters, good night -- good night humor and arthur schulz burger jr. good night publishers whose jobs are in flux, good night, steven king, who is wearing a tux. good night, unknowns and good night, famous, good might, elle moth
while because this may be like the last supper. the next dan may 4, 1961, we left washington, traveled from here on our way to new orleans. the first incident occurred in charlotte, north carolina. back in 1861, but he floodway people couldn't be seated together on a greyhound bus. could you share the same weight room come the same restroom facilities. segregation was the order of the day. the charlotte, north carolina in may 1961, young african-american man entered the so-called white waiting room. he went into the waiting room and later into the barbershop and tried to get shoeshine. he was arrested and taken to jail. the next day, went to trial in the jury dismissed the charges against him. on that same afternoon, a young white gentleman by the name of avid hello, wonderful man from connecticut. the two of us try to entry so-called white waiting room. we were met by a group of young men who beat us the leftist lane in a pool of blood. a local authorities came up and wanted to know whether we wanted to press charges. we said no, we believe in peace and love and nonviolence. that was
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11